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Ocular manifestations of Sturge-Weber syndrome: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

Sturge-Weber syndrome has been included in the group of phakomatoses that is characterized by hamartomas involving the brain, skin, and eyes. The characteristic facial port-wine stain, involving the first branch of the trigeminal nerve and the embryonic vasculature distribution in this area, leads to several ocular complications of the anterior segment and can involve the eyelids and conjunctiva. The posterior segment of the eyes is also affected with diffuse choroidal hemangiomas. However, the most frequent ocular comorbidity is glaucoma with a prevalence rate ranging from 30%-70%. Glaucoma is related to anterior chamber malformations, high episcleral venous pressure (EVP), and changes in ocular hemodynamics. Glaucoma can be diagnosed at birth, but the disease can also develop during childhood and in adults. The management of glaucoma in Sturge-Weber syndrome patients is particularly challenging because of early onset, frequently associated severe visual field impairment at the time of diagnosis, and unresponsiveness to standard treatment. Several surgical approaches have been proposed, but long-term prognosis for both intraocular pressure control and visual function remains unsatisfactory in these patients. Choroidal hemangiomas may also lead to visual impairment thorough exudative retinal detachment and macular edema. Treatment of exudative hemangioma complications is aimed at destructing the tumor or decreasing tumor leakage.

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