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Significant heat sensitivity increase detected in various types of diabetes mellitus patients by Akabane test for use of management of diabetic patients.

In order to assess patterns of heat sensitivity thresholds in patients with diabetes mellitus, the Akabane test was carried out on patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) (250 men and 309 women) and patients with noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) (158 men and 227 women). For comparison, a group of healthy subjects made up of 116 men and 277 women was also used. As soon as we revealed the influence of factors of pathology with a high significance level and gender and the interaction "gender*pathology", all the results are described separately for groups of men and women and for groups with IDDM and NIDDM. Simple effects of paired comparisons between healthy subjects, IDDM and NIDDM in groups of men and women, as well as comparisons between the profiles of men and women with IDDM and NIDDM showed significant differences between ACs in healthy subjects and those with each type of diabetes. The most significant differences are seen in the AC connected with the digestive system (SP pancreas channel), LR (liver channel), ST (stomach channel), GB (gall bladder channel). Thus, we revealed characteristic pattern of acupuncture channels (AC) lesions inherent to diabetes pathology, i.e. most vulnerable in diabetes ACs, being compromised in dependence from such factors, as type of diabetes, hyper or hypoglycemia, and from gender. The main value of the method lies in the fact that we observe the entire food chain from food ingestion to the utilization of carbohydrates with the opportunity to assess the activity of each organ and its regulatory contribution. On the basis of the body's response, an individual selection of medicines can be made, and by evaluating the individual biorhythms it is possible to determine the optimal time of administration.

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