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Foreskin Morbidity in Uncircumcised Males.

Pediatrics 2016 May
OBJECTIVE: As a consequence of the discussion on whether the health benefits of newborn male circumcision outweigh the risks and the discrepancies in reported figures of complications, we evaluated the incidence and morbidity of foreskin surgery due to medical indications in boys from the Capital Region of Denmark in 2014.

METHODS: Medical records from all boys operated on the foreskin due to medical reasons in the Capital Region in 2014 were reviewed. Patients with hypospadias, ritual circumcision, and redo-surgery because of complications to nontherapeutic circumcision were excluded.

RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were included. The cumulative risk of undergoing foreskin operation before 18 years of age was 1.7%. Forty patients had histologic verified balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) corresponding to a total risk of 0.37% of developing BXO. Mean age at surgery was 10.1 years (range 1-17). Phimosis was the most frequently reported indication (95.0%). The remaining 5.0% underwent surgery because of frenulum breve causing problems during erection. Before surgery, 27.1% had foreskin-related voiding problems and 17.1% had at least 1 episode of balanitis. Circumcision was initially performed in 44 cases. The remaining 137 patients had a foreskin-preserving operation performed. Nine boys had secondary circumcision after initially having foreskin-preserving operation. Fifty patients initially had preputial histology performed. BXO was verified in 37 patients. Of the 9 patients with redo-surgery due to recurrent phimosis, a further 3 had histologically verified BXO.

CONCLUSIONS: Childhood foreskin-related problems in a region with no tradition of newborn male circumcision should not be neglected.

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