COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The Supine Position Technique Method Is Better Than the Conventional Method for Manual Reduction of Acute Nontraumatic Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation.

OBJECTIVE: To comparatively assess the effectiveness of the supine position technique versus the conventional method, for the manual reduction of acute nontraumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation.

METHODS: This randomized single blind trial included a total of 40 patients, aged 18 to 80 years presenting with acute nontraumatic TMJ dislocation. Based on the randomization procedure, patients were treated with either conventional method or the supine position technique method. The visibility of dynamic occlusion during jaw manipulation, operation time, and visual analogue scale scores for pain perception were comparatively studied.

RESULTS: All patients with dislocated mandible were successfully managed. Unlike the conventional technique, the ability to monitor the dynamic occlusion during jaw manipulation was possible only in the supine position method group. The operation time (P < 0.05) and visual analogue scale scores for pain perception (P < 0.01) during the treatment were significantly reduced in the supine position technique group. No accidental finger biting was reported in any groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Reduced operation time and reduced pain perception indicated that the supine position technique method might be a more viable alternative to the conventional method of reduction of acute nontraumatic TMJ dislocation.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app