Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Histological characteristics of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a predominantly radiographic diagnosis and histological knowledge of DISH is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the histological characteristics of DISH in the spinal column and to study the relation between DISH and intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Therefore, 10 human cadaveric spines with fluoroscopic evidence of DISH were compared with 10 controls. Plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained and tissue blocks were resected from three predefined levels of all specimens. The microscopic sections were scored by two blinded observers using a newly developed scoring system specific for characteristics of DISH and a validated scoring system for IVD degeneration. Maximum IVD height was measured on the CT scans. Analyses were performed using Fisher's exact test and Student's t-test. When compared to controls, the right sided sections from DISH specimens showed partial or complete bone bridges, consisting of cortical woven bone, accompanied by morphological changes in the adjoining part of the IVD. Using the histological scoring system for DISH, all parameters were significantly different between the DISH and control group (p < 0.01). The contralateral location did not show differences between the groups. The overall degree of IVD degeneration and height of IVD was comparable for the two groups. The histopathological changes observed in spines with DISH corresponded to the fluoroscopic images and CT scans. The degree of IVD degeneration and IVD height was comparable for both groups, suggesting a limited role for IVD degeneration in the pathogenesis of DISH. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:140-146, 2017.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app