JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Feasibility and Safety of Substituting Lung Ultrasonography for Chest Radiography When Diagnosing Pneumonia in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Chest 2016 July
BACKGROUND: Chest radiography (CXR) is the test of choice for diagnosing pneumonia. Lung ultrasonography (LUS) has been shown to be accurate for diagnosing pneumonia in children and may be an alternative to CXR. Our objective was to determine the feasibility and safety of substituting LUS for CXR when evaluating children suspected of having pneumonia.

METHODS: We conducted a randomized control trial comparing LUS with CXR in 191 children from birth to 21 years of age suspected of having pneumonia in an ED. Patients in the investigational arm underwent LUS. If there was clinical uncertainty after ultrasonography, physicians had the option to perform CXR. Patients in the control arm underwent sequential imaging with CXR followed by LUS. The primary outcome was the rate of CXR reduction; secondary outcomes were missed pneumonia, subsequent unscheduled health-care visits, and adverse events between the investigational and control arms.

RESULTS: There was a 38.8% reduction (95% CI, 30.0%-48.9%) in CXR among investigational subjects compared with no reduction (95% CI, 0.0%-3.6%) in the control group. Novice and experienced physician-sonologists achieved 30.0% and 60.6% reduction in CXR use, respectively. There were no cases of missed pneumonia among all study participants (investigational arm, 0.0%: 95% CI, 0.0%-2.9%; control arm, 0.0%: 95% CI, 0.0%-3.0%), or differences in adverse events, or subsequent unscheduled health-care visits between arms.

CONCLUSIONS: It may be feasible and safe to substitute LUS for CXR when evaluating children suspected of having pneumonia with no missed cases of pneumonia or increase in rates of adverse events.

TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01654887; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app