JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Aging among persons with hemophilia: contemporary concerns

Dana Angelini, Barbara A Konkle, Suman L Sood
Seminars in Hematology 2016, 53 (1): 35-9
26805905
The life expectancy of persons with hemophilia (PWH) has increased almost 10-fold over the past seven decades, largely due to access to safe factor replacement products. Concomitant with this success, however, comes the burden of aging. Older PWH are developing similar comorbidities as the general population, including increasing rates of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes, which predispose them to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). How their coagulopathy affects the expression of these conditions remains unclear. In addition, the elderly hemophilia population must cope with chronic joint arthropathy, which provokes falls and fractures, and complications related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, which greatly impact the incidence of cancer and liver disease. With a dearth of evidence-based guidelines to direct therapy, a new challenge has arisen for hematologists to optimally manage these complex age-related issues. This review will focus on common complications affecting the older hemophilia population, including joint disease, CVD, malignancy, renal insufficiency, and liver disease.

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