JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Prevention and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Cancer: Focus on Drug Therapy.

Drugs 2016 March
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication in patients with cancer and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The use of anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of VTE in this population is challenging given the high risk of both recurrent VTE and bleeding complications. Thromboprophylaxis with subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is recommended in cancer patients hospitalized for an acute medical illness and in those undergoing major surgery. In ambulatory cancer patients with or without central venous catheters, routine thromboprophylaxis is not recommended because of the relatively low benefit-to-risk ratio. To identify cancer outpatients at very high risk of VTE who may benefit from thromboprophylaxis, VTE risk stratification tools based on tumour type, clinical parameters, or coagulation biomarkers have been proposed, but their clinical utility needs validation. The mainstay of treatment for cancer-associated VTE is LMWH for at least 6 months or longer in case of active disease. The same initial and long-term treatment for incidental VTE as for symptomatic VTE can be suggested while awaiting additional studies in this area.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app