JOURNAL ARTICLE
META-ANALYSIS
REVIEW
SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
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Local administration of gentamicin collagen sponge in surgical excision of sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.

Surgical site infections occur in up to 24 % of patients after surgical excision of sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus disease with primary wound closure. Local administration of antibiotics by a gentamicin collagen sponge could reduce this infection rate. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of a gentamicin collagen sponge on outcome after surgical excision in patients with sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus disease. A structured literature search was performed in the PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases. Studies comparing surgical excision of sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus disease with versus without a gentamicin collagen sponge were included. Outcome measures were surgical site infection, wound healing, and recurrence. The search strategy yielded six studies with a total of 669 patients. Three randomized controlled trials, comparing excision of pilonidal sinus disease and primary wound closure with versus without gentamicin collagen sponge, were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis (319 patients), demonstrating a trend towards reduced surgical site infections after administration of gentamicin collagen sponge [absolute risk reduction 20 %, 95 %-confidence interval (CI) 1-41 %, p = 0.06]. The wound healing (absolute risk reduction 22 %, 95 % CI 32-77 %, p = 0.42) and recurrence rate (absolute risk reduction 8 %, 95 % CI 7-22 %, p = 0.30) were not significantly different between both groups. Administration of a gentamicin collagen sponge after surgical excision of sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus disease showed no significant influence on wound healing and recurrence rate, but a trend towards a reduced incidence of surgical site infections. Therefore, additional larger well-designed randomized controlled trials are required.

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