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Antiandrogenic Therapy with Ciproterone Acetate in Female Patients Who Suffer from Both Androgenetic Alopecia and Acne Vulgaris.

BACKGROUND: Androgenetic Alopecia in Women (AGA) occurs due to an underlying susceptibility of hair follicles to androgenic miniaturization, caused by androgens. Clinically, AGA is characterized by progressive hair loss, with a marked hair thinning in the fronto-parietal area so that the scalp can be easily seen. Acne vulgaris is androgen-dependent and often affects the skin that has an increased number of oil glands: face, back and chest. Although the sebaceous glands are present on the scalp too, it is very rare to get acne at this site, as the hair acts as a wig and allows the sebum to drain and does not block the pores. Both AGA and Acne Vulgaris are signs of hyperandrogenism. Cyproterone acetate/ethinyl estradiol (2mg/0.035mg) products are authorized for the treatment of androgenetic symptoms in women, such as acne, seborrhea, mild forms of hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. Our study had a double purpose: - To evaluate the result of the study regimen Melleva 35 (one pill per day, for 3 consecutive months) in patients with moderate to severe acne, suffering also from Androgenetic Alopecia;- To establish the efficacy of the drug on acne and alopecia improvement, both from the doctor's and patient's point of view.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: After being informed of the aims and procedures of the study, participants provided a written informed consent. A number of 35 female subjects with moderate to severe acne vulgaris remained in the study. The subjects had also been diagnosed as suffering from AGA, on the basis of clinical criteria, including the pattern of hair loss and trichoscopy assessment.

RESULTS: 83% of study subjects reported that their hair did not continue to fall after 3 months of antiandrogen therapy. The females were evaluated using trichoscopy and the doctor noticed hair regrowth in 77% of the cases. Regarding the improvement of acne lesions after the treatment, 40% of study subjects recorded good improvement and 26% recorded excellent results with Melleva 35. The acceptance of the treatment was very high, 86% patients were compliant with the study therapy. The rate of adverse events (5 cases) was within the limits of the treatment tested by the study. Almost a third of the total number of subjects (28.5%) reached a good satisfaction level after the treatment, while 37.1% claimed moderate satisfaction.

CONCLUSION: There was no correlation between the age of the subjects and the treatment for acne therefore our first hypothesis was rejected. As a conclusion, antiandrogenic therapy with Melleva 35, 1 pill per day, for 3 consecutive months, shows good results for patients who suffer from both Androgenetic Alopecia and Acne Vulgaris.

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