JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Thromboembolism as an important complication of inflammatory bowel disease.

BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher risk of developing thromboembolic events (TE) compared with the healthy population.

AIM: This study aimed to describe a cohort of IBD patients with a history of TE focusing on recurrence of TE, disease activity and IBD medication at the time of TE and surgery before TE.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective monocentric cohort study, we included IBD patients in whom an arterial and/or venous TE occurred.

RESULTS: Eighty-four IBD patients with a history of TE (63% Crohn's disease, 44% men) and a mean age of 45±15 years were included; 25/84 patients (30%) were identified to have recurrent TE. Seventy out of 84 (83%) developed a venous TE, with a deep vein thrombosis as the major manifestation (28/70, 40%), followed by a pulmonary embolism (16/70, 23%). At the time of TE, 60/84 (71%) patients were diagnosed with active disease. In all, 23% patients were on 5-aminosalicylic acids, 36% on steroids, 18% on azathioprine, 5% on methotrexate, 12% on biologicals and 23% were not receiving specific IBD treatment. Moreover, within a 6-month period preceding the TE, 28/84 (33%) patients underwent surgery, of whom 17% received thromboprophylaxis at hospital discharge.

CONCLUSION: We confirm the association between disease activity and the occurrence of TE. A substantial number of patients had additional risk factors such as recurrence of TE. In all, 36% received steroids at the time of TE and 33% underwent recent surgery, of whom only a minority received thromboprophylaxis at hospital discharge. Further efforts are required to increase thromboprophylaxis in at-risk patients.

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