JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Overlaps between Frailty and Sarcopenia Definitions

Tommy Cederholm
Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series 2015, 83: 65-9
26484770
Aging is characterized by the catabolism of muscles leading to sarcopenia and frailty. These are two geriatric syndromes with partly overlapping phenotypes. Primary sarcopenia, i.e. loss of muscle mass and function related to aging alone, usually precedes frailty. Thus, robustness passes from sarcopenia over frailty to disability leading eventually to a mortal outcome. Frailty (defined according to the phenotype model) encompasses states as exhaustion, weakness, and slowness, whereas sarcopenia, combining mass and function, is more strictly focused on muscles. Frailty is age related, whereas sarcopenia is also related to disease, starvation, and disuse. In general, the criteria for the two conditions overlap, but frailty requires weight loss, whereas sarcopenia requires muscle loss. Both gait speed and hand grip strength are suggested to be used as diagnostic measures for the two conditions since muscle function is crucial for any of the two syndromes. It is suggested that frailty screening should be part of the geriatric comprehensive assessment starting with measuring walking capacity and complemented by taking a history of fatigue and low activity. For younger adults (i.e. <70 years), sarcopenia screening could first register gait speed or hand grip strength and then body composition measurements. Simple questionnaires are feasible clinical alternatives. Treatment of frailty and sarcopenia overlaps, i.e. provide adequate protein and vitamin D supplementation, and encourage resistance exercise.

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