Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Extended anticoagulation with apixaban reduces hospitalisations in patients with venous thromboembolism. An analysis of the AMPLIFY-EXT trial.

Treatment with apixaban versus placebo for 12 months significantly reduced symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) or all-cause death without increasing the rate of major bleeding in the AMPLIFY-EXT trial. This analysis examined the effects of apixaban versus placebo on the rate of all-cause hospitalisations, time to first hospitalisation, and predictors of first hospitalisation in patients with VTE enrolled in AMPLIFY-EXT. Treatment with apixaban 2.5 mg and 5 mg twice daily significantly reduced the rate of all-cause hospitalisations versus placebo (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.64 [0.43, 0.95]; p=0.026 and 0.54 [0.36, 0.82]; p=0.004, respectively). Apixaban prolonged mean time to first hospitalisation versus placebo by 43 and 49 days for the 2.5-mg and 5-mg twice-daily groups, respectively. Median length of hospital stay during the first hospitalisation was longer for placebo than for apixaban 2.5 mg or 5 mg twice daily (7.0, 5.0, and 4.5 days, respectively). Treatment with apixaban was a significant predictor of lower rates of hospitalisations versus placebo, and severe/moderate renal impairment was a significant predictor of an increased rate. This study supports extended use of apixaban for reducing all-cause hospitalisations and extending time to first hospitalisation in patients with VTE enrolled in AMPLIFY-EXT (www.clinicaltrials.gov registration: #NCT00633893).

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