MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search
OPEN IN READ APP
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pregnancy outcome of 126 anti-SSA/Ro-positive patients during the past 24 years—a retrospective cohort study

Yan Luo, Lili Zhang, Yunyun Fei, Yiqun Li, Donglin Hao, Yi Liu, Yan Zhao
Clinical Rheumatology 2015, 34 (10): 1721-8
26384980
The aims of our study are to observe the pregnancy outcome of anti-Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA)/Ro-positive women and to predict the risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcome and neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE). Clinical data of 126 anti-SSA/Ro-positive patients with 140 pregnancies were evaluated retrospectively, and the newborns were followed up as a cohort in 3 months. χ (2) test or logistic regression was used to predict the risk factors of lupus flares during pregnancy, fetal loss, and NLE. Twenty-six out of 93 pregnancies with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) experienced flares during pregnancy. Active disease prior to conception was the independent risk factor for flares [P = 0.002, odds ratio (OR) = 10.41 (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 2.34∼46.26)]. Continuous use of steroids and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) might help decrease the risk (P = 0.041 and 0.015, respectively). Eleven out of 140 pregnancies ended with fetal loss, and 9 out of 113 live births were diagnosed with NLE. The presence of anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) was associated with fetal loss (P = 0.018, OR = 6.41 (95 % CI = 1.57-26.14)). The presence of anti-Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen B (SSB)/La antibodies tended to increase the risk of giving birth to an infant with NLE (P = 0.140); on the other hand, duration of disease, history of renal involvement, and active SLE during pregnancy did not contribute to the incidence of NLE (P = 0.649, 0.685, and 1.000, respectively). Active disease without regular follow-up before conception significantly increased the risk of lupus flares during pregnancy. The continuous use of low-dose steroids and hydroxychloroquine might help maintain lower SLE activity. Concurrent APS instead of high titer of anti-SSA/Ro might raise the risk of fetal loss in anti-SSA/Ro-positive patients.

Comments

You need to log in or sign up for an account to be able to comment.

No comments yet, be the first to post one!

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
26384980
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"