JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effects of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system on lymphangiogenesis of adenomyosis.

OBJECTIVES: Lymphangiogenesis may be involved in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. We investigated the lymphatic vessels of patients with adenomyosis, including those treated with levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS).

METHODS: Full-thickness uterine samples were obtained from patients who received hysterectomies. Twenty-one patients with adenomyosis and 17 patients with adenomyosis who were treated with LNG-IUS were included. Eighteen patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia served as controls. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with antibodies against podoplanin and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1. The lymphovascular density (LVD) was analyzed in each sample by the "hot spot" method.

RESULTS: The LVDs were significantly higher in the endometrial and myometrial tissues of patients with adenomyosis compared with those of patients treated with the LNG-IUS or controls. No significant differences were noted between the LNG-IUS-treated group and controls. Evaluation of the LVDs according to the menstrual cycle showed that the differences in the endometrial tissues of the adenomyosis group and those of the LNG-IUS-treated group or the controls were more prominent during the secretory phase.

CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with the LNG-IUS resulted in reduced lymphangiogenesis and LVD in the endometrial and myometrial tissues of patients with adenomyosis. Reduced lymphangiogenesis may be one mechanism by which the LNG-IUS reduces adenomyosis-related symptoms.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app