JOURNAL ARTICLE

The critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students: A grounded theory research study

Traci J Starkey
Nurse Education Today 2015, 35 (5): 718-25
25660266

BACKGROUND: As the demographics of the United States change, nursing will need to become more ethnically diverse in order to provide culturally responsive healthcare. Enrollment of English as Second Language nursing students is increasing; however, these students often encounter academic difficulties. The increase in English as Second Language nursing students in the classroom and clinical setting has posed challenges for nurse faculty.

OBJECTIVE: To explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students.

DESIGN: A grounded theory method based on the philosophical underpinnings of symbolic interactionism and pragmatism was used to explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students.

SETTINGS: The study took place at various schools of nursing in the Southeast Florida area.

PARTICIPANTS: Educators teaching in an associate, baccalaureate, and/or graduate nursing program at an accredited school of nursing.

METHODS: Semi-structured interviews and a focus group were conducted to collect data from nurse faculty. Data segments from interviews were coded, categorized, and analyzed. Theoretical sampling and a focus group interview were used to validate the concepts, themes, and categories identified during the individual interviews. A substantive level theory was developed.

RESULTS: The core category that developed was conscientization. The three dominant categories that emerged from the data were overcoming, coming to know, and facilitating. The theoretical framework of conscientization provided an explanation of the social processes involved in teaching English as Second Language nursing students.

CONCLUSIONS: The theoretical framework developed from this study can be used to increase the effectiveness of teaching English as Second Language nursing students, improve their chances of success, and enhance diversity in the nursing profession.

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