Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Impact of gender difference in hospital outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention. Results of the Belgian Working Group on Interventional Cardiology (BWGIC) registry.

EuroIntervention 2016 June 13
AIMS: To determine whether there are gender-based differences in in-hospital outcomes among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied a large cohort using clinical data from a registry of 130,985 PCI procedures in Belgium, from January 2006 to February 2011. Compared to males, females were significantly older (70.3 vs. 64.8 years), and were more frequently diabetic or hypertensive. Men smoked more and more frequently had previous myocardial infarction (MI), previous PCI or previous coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Coronary artery disease (CAD) was less severe in women, and PCI to the left anterior descending artery was more common in female patients. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were higher in females versus males (2.5% for women and 1.6% for men, p<0.0001). After multivariable analysis, female gender remained an independent predictor of mortality (odds ratio 1.35, 95% CI: 1.22-1.49, p<0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS: Gender-based differences in hospital mortality rates after PCI were observed in this large registry. Female sex remained an independent predictor of mortality after multivariable adjustment.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app