Comparative Study
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Extraintestinal manifestations in a large series of Italian inflammatory bowel disease patients.

AIM: To investigate prevalence, type and time of onset of extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) in a series of Italian inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients.

METHODS: Data of 811 IBD consecutive patients, first referred to our Centre from 2000 to 2011, were retrospectively evaluated.

RESULTS: Eight hundred and eleven IBD patients (437 M, 374 F) were studied: 595 ulcerative colitis (UC) (73.4%) and 216 Crohn's disease (CD) (26.6%). Among these, 329 (40.6%) showed EIMs: 210 UC (35.3%) and 119 CD (55.1%) (P < 0.0001). Considering the time of the diagnosis of IBD, 37 EIMs (11.2%) were developed before, 229 (69.6%) after and 63 (19.2%) were simultaneous. The type of EIM were as follows: 240 musculoskeletal (29.6%), in 72 CD patients and in 168 UC (P < 0.0001); 47 mucocutaneous (5.8%), in 26 CD and in 21 UC (P = 0.0049); 26 ocular (3.2%), in 16 CD and in 10 UC (CD 7.4% vs UC 1.7%, P = 0.0093); 6 hepatobiliary (0.8%); 10 endocrinological (1.2%). In particular, with regards to the involvement of the musculoskeletal system, arthritis Type 1 was found in 41 CD (19%) and in 61 UC (10.2%) (P = 0.0012) and Type 2 in 25 CD (11.6%) and in 100 UC (16.8%) (P = 0.0012).

CONCLUSION: Mucocutaneous manifestations, arthritis Type 1 and uveitis were significantly more frequent in CD than UC. The complications of the musculoskeletal system were the mostly observed ones, often with symptoms more severe than intestinal ones, confirming the need for close cooperation with rheumatologists.

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