COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
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Fungal and viral infections after allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation from unrelated donors in adults: improving outcomes over time.

Umbilical cord blood (CB) is increasingly used as an alternative source of stem cells in adult unrelated transplantation. Although registry studies report similar overall outcomes in comparison with BM/PB, comparative studies focusing on severe infections and infection-RM (IRM) with a long follow-up are scarce. A total of 434 consecutive unrelated transplants (1997-2009) were retrospectively analyzed to compare overall outcomes, incidence and risk factors of severe viral and invasive fungal infections in CB (n=65) vs BM/PB recipients (n=369). The 5-year OS was 38 vs 43%, respectively (P=0.2). CB transplantation (CBT) was associated with a higher risk of invasive aspergillosis (100-days-cumulative incidence 16 vs 6%, P=0.04) and CMV infection without differences in RM. No statistically significant differences were found regarding NRM (NRM of 38% in CB vs 37% in BM/PB at 1 year) nor IRM (30% in CB vs 27% in BM/PB at 1 year). In the overall population, NRM and IRM improved in more recent years. In adults who receive a single CBT, the risk of severe infections is increased when compared with unrelated BM/PB recipients, but mortality from infections is similar, leading to similar NRM and survival.

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