CASE REPORTS
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Ocular Inflammation: Can It Be a Sign of Activity of Weber-Christian Disease? A Case Report and Review of Literature.

PURPOSE: To present a case of Weber-Christian disease with symptomatic ocular involvment. Weber-Christian disease is a relapsing febrile nodular nonsuppurative panniculitis. It is characterized by malaise and fever accompanied by subcutaneous inflammatory nodules on the trunk and extremities. It can affect several organs, but ocular signs have been infrequently described in literature.

METHODS: A 20-year-old woman with Weber-Christian disease presented with severe bilateral ocular inflammation. A complete ophthalmologic examination was performed.

RESULTS: Visual acuity was 20/100 in both eyes and slit-lamp examination showed bilateral iridocyclitis. Bilateral cortico-nuclear cataract did not allow funduscopy and she underwent cataract extraction. Retinal vasculitis was detected.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with Weber-Christian disease can develop severe ocular inflammation. A complete ophthalmolgic examination should be done in these patients, especially when ocular involvement is the main sign of the disease. A further understanding of the severity of ocular inflammation proved fundamental in the management of the disease.

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