JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY

Total, caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea intake and gastric cancer risk: results from the EPIC cohort study

Harinakshi Sanikini, Vincent K Dik, Peter D Siersema, Nirmala Bhoo-Pathy, Cuno S P M Uiterwaal, Petra H M Peeters, Carlos A González, Raul Zamora-Ros, Kim Overvad, Anne Tjønneland, Nina Roswall, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Guy Fagherazzi, Antoine Racine, Tilman Kühn, Verena Katzke, Heiner Boeing, Antonia Trichopoulou, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Pagona Lagiou, Domenico Palli, Sara Grioni, Paolo Vineis, Rosario Tumino, Salvatore Panico, Elisabete Weiderpass, Guri Skeie, Tonje Braaten, José María Huerta, Emilio Sánchez-Cantalejo, Aurelio Barricarte, Emily Sonestedt, Peter Wallstrom, Lena Maria Nilsson, Ingegerd Johansson, Kathryn E Bradbury, Kay-Tee Khaw, Nick Wareham, Inge Huybrechts, Heinz Freisling, Amanda J Cross, Elio Riboli, H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer 2015 March 15, 136 (6): E720-30
25236393
Prospective studies examining the association between coffee and tea consumption and gastric cancer risk have shown inconsistent results. We investigated the association between coffee (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) and tea consumption and the risk of gastric cancer by anatomical site and histological type in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Coffee and tea consumption were assessed by dietary questionnaires at baseline. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox regression models. During 11.6 years of follow up, 683 gastric adenocarcinoma cases were identified among 477,312 participants. We found no significant association between overall gastric cancer risk and consumption of total coffee (HR 1.09, 95%-confidence intervals [CI]: 0.84-1.43; quartile 4 vs. non/quartile 1), caffeinated coffee (HR 1.14, 95%-CI: 0.82-1.59; quartile 4 vs. non/quartile 1), decaffeinated coffee (HR 1.07, 95%-CI: 0.75-1.53; tertile 3 vs. non/tertile 1) and tea (HR 0.81, 95%-CI: 0.59-1.09; quartile 4 vs. non/quartile 1). When stratified by anatomical site, we observed a significant positive association between gastric cardia cancer risk and total coffee consumption per increment of 100 mL/day (HR 1.06, 95%-CI: 1.03-1.11). Similarly, a significant positive association was observed between gastric cardia cancer risk and caffeinated coffee consumption (HR 1.98, 95%-CI: 1.16-3.36, p-trend=0.06; quartile 3 vs. non/quartile 1) and per increment of 100 mL/day (HR 1.09, 95%-CI: 1.04-1.14). In conclusion, consumption of total, caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea is not associated with overall gastric cancer risk. However, total and caffeinated coffee consumption may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cardia cancer. Further prospective studies are needed to rule out chance or confounding.

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