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Frequencies and geographic distributions of genetic mutations in transthyretin- and non-transthyretin-related familial amyloidosis.

Clinical Genetics 2015 October
Inherited forms of amyloidosis are rare; of these, transthyretin-related (ATTR) is the most common, but non-ATTR has been described as well. We studied a large case series of ATTR and a small series of non-ATTR to better determine the mutation frequencies and geographic distributions of these inherited forms of amyloidosis in the United States. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of 284 ATTR and non-ATTR patients seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from 1 January 1970 through 29 January 2013. Mutations were identified by DNA sequencing, restriction fragment length polymorphism, or mass spectroscopy. The genetic testing method was unknown for several patients, but a small proportion were identified by family history or by classical clinical presentation associated with a specific mutation. The most common ATTR mutations were Thr60Ala (24%), Val30Met (15%), Val122Ile (10%), and Ser77Tyr (5%). Non-ATTR mutations included gelsolin (n = 3), apolipoprotein A-I (n = 6), apolipoprotein A-II (n = 1), fibrinogen A-α (n = 9), and lysozyme (n = 1). Although rare, ATTR and, to a lesser extent, non-ATTR are prevalent in the United States and should be considered for patients presenting in the appropriate clinical context.

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