Clinical Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Long-term surgical outcomes of Quickert sutures for involutional lower eyelid entropion.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the long-term surgical outcomes associated with the use of Quickert sutures (Q-sutures) for involutional entropion and elucidate the risk factors for postoperative recurrences.

METHODS: This is a retrospective, interventional case series. We recruited patients suffering from involutional entropion who were treated with Q-sutures during the period from January 2008 to August 2010. Preoperative clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes including recurrence at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months were investigated by reviewing the medical charts.

RESULTS: Of 85 patients, 69 attended each follow-up visit and were included in the analysis. Thirty-four patients (49.3%) experienced recurrences within 2 years. The recurrence rate was 5 of 69 (7.2%) at 1 month, 15 of 64 (21.6%) at 6 months, 9 of 49 (13%) at 12 months, and 5 of 40 (7.2%) at 2 years. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that men and patients with lower-lid laxity (OR = 2.852 [95% CI: 1.005-8.092] and OR = 3.780 [95% CI: 1.231-11.614], respectively) were susceptible to postoperative recurrences.

CONCLUSIONS: The recurrence rate among patients treated with Q-sutures was highest at the 6-month follow-up visit. Alternative surgical options should be considered in males and those with lower-lid laxity in order to prevent recurrences.

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