JOURNAL ARTICLE

Protective effects of glucosamine hydrochloride against free radical-induced erythrocytes damage

Khadijeh Jamialahmadi, Omid Arasteh, Maryam Matbou Riahi, Soghra Mehri, Bamdad Riahi-Zanjani, Gholamreza Karimi
Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology 2014, 38 (1): 212-9
24959958
Glucosamine (GlcN) is an important precursor in the biochemical synthesis of glycosylated proteins and lipids in human body. It gains importance because of its contribution to human health and its multiple biological and therapeutic effects. In this study, the in vitro oxidative hemolysis of rat erythrocyte was used as a model to study the potential protective effect of glucosamine hydrochloride against free radical-induced damage of biological membranes. Glucosamine hydrochloride exhibited dose-dependent DPPH antioxidant activity. Oxidative hemolysis and lipid/protein peroxidation of erythrocytes induced by a water-soluble free radical initiator 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) were significantly suppressed by GlcN in a time and dose dependent manner. GlcN also prevented the depletion of cytosolic antioxidant glutathione (GSH) in erythrocytes. These results indicated that glucosamine hydrochloride efficiently protected erythrocytes against free radicals and it could be recommended as a pharmaceutical supplement to alleviate oxidative stress.

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