JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
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Surgical management of hepatic hemangiomas: a multi-institutional experience.

BACKGROUND: The management of hepatic hemangiomas remains ill defined. This study sought to investigate the indications, surgical management and outcomes of patients who underwent a resection for hepatic hemangiomas.

METHODS: A retrospective review from six major liver centres in the United States identifying patients who underwent surgery for hepatic hemangiomas was performed. Clinico-pathological, treatment and peri-operative data were evaluated.

RESULTS: Of the 241patients who underwent a resection, the median age was 46 years [interquartile range (IQR): 39-53] and 85.5% were female. The median hemangioma size was 8.5 cm (IQR: 6-12.1). Surgery was performed for abdominal symptoms (85%), increasing hemangioma size (11.3%) and patient anxiety (3.7%). Life-threatening complications necessitating a hemangioma resection occurred in three patients (1.2%). Clavien Grade 3 or higher complications occurred in 14 patients (5.7%). The 30- and 90-day mortality was 0.8% (n = 2). Of patients with abdominal symptoms, 63.2% reported improvement of symptoms post-operatively.

CONCLUSION: A hemangioma resection can be safely performed at high-volume institutions. The primary indication for surgery remains for intractable symptoms. The development of severe complications associated with non-operative management remains a rare event, ultimately challenging the necessity of additional surgical indications for a hemangioma resection.

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