Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Randomized trial of acetylcysteine in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

BACKGROUND: Acetylcysteine has been suggested as a beneficial treatment for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, although data from placebo-controlled studies are lacking.

METHODS: In our initial double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned patients who had idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with mild-to-moderate impairment in pulmonary function to receive a three-drug regimen of prednisone, azathioprine, and acetylcysteine; acetylcysteine alone; or placebo. The study was interrupted owing to safety concerns associated with the three-drug regimen. The trial continued as a two-group study (acetylcysteine vs. placebo) without other changes; 133 and 131 patients were enrolled in the acetylcysteine and placebo groups, respectively. The primary outcome was the change in forced vital capacity (FVC) over a 60-week period.

RESULTS: At 60 weeks, there was no significant difference in the change in FVC between the acetylcysteine group and the placebo group (-0.18 liters and -0.19 liters, respectively; P=0.77). In addition, there were no significant differences between the acetylcysteine group and the placebo group in the rates of death (4.9% vs. 2.5%, P=0.30 by the log-rank test) or acute exacerbation (2.3% in each group, P>0.99).

CONCLUSIONS: As compared with placebo, acetylcysteine offered no significant benefit with respect to the preservation of FVC in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with mild-to-moderate impairment in lung function. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00650091.).

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app