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Acquired Thrombophilia.

Acquired thrombophilia is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the most prevalent acquired thrombophilia and is associated with both venous and arterial thromboses. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is another form of acquired thrombophilia. Risk factors associated with VTE in this population include those related to the disease itself, host factors, and the pharmacotherapy for HIV. A significant proportion of VTE events occur in patients with malignancies. There is an increase in mortality associated with patients having cancer who experience VTE when compared to patients having cancer without VTE. Combination oral contraceptive (COC) use infers risk of thromboembolic events. The risk is dependent upon the presence of an underlying inherited thrombophilia, the estrogen dose, and generation of progestin. Patients at highest risk of VTE include those receiving high-dose estrogen and fourth-generation, progesterone-containing contraceptives. With the exception of APS, thrombophilia status does not alter the acute treatment of an initial VTE in nonpregnant patients.

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