JOURNAL ARTICLE
META-ANALYSIS
REVIEW
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Hypertonic saline plus i.v. furosemide improve renal safety profile and clinical outcomes in acute decompensated heart failure: A meta-analysis of the literature.

Herz 2015 May
BACKGROUND: In advanced congestive heart failure (CHF), intravenous (i.v.) inotropic agents, i.v. diuretics, ultrafiltration, and hemodialysis have been shown to not yield better clinical outcomes. In this scenario, the simultaneous administration of hypertonic saline solution (HSS) and furosemide may offer a more effective therapeutic option with a good safety profile.

METHODS: Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed to compare combined therapy, consisting of i.v. furosemide plus concomitant administration of HSS, with i.v. furosemide alone for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). The outcomes we chose were all-cause mortality, risk of re-hospitalization for ADHF, length of hospital stay, weight loss, and variation of serum creatinine.

RESULTS: Based on five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 1,032 patients treated with i.v. HSS plus furosemide vs. 1,032 patients treated with i.v. furosemide alone, a decrease in all-cause mortality in patients treated with HSS plus furosemide was proven [RR = 0.57; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.44-0.74, p = 0.0003]. Likewise, combined therapy with HSS plus furosemide was shown to be associated with a reduced risk of ADHF-related re-hospitalization (RR = 0.51; 95 % CI = 0.35-0.75, p = 0.001). Besides, combined therapy with HSS plus furosemide was found to be associated with a reduced length of hospital stay (p = 0.0002), greater weight loss (p < 0.00001), and better preservation of renal function (p < 0.00001).

CONCLUSION: HSS as an adjunct to i.v. furosemide for diuretic-resistant CHF patients led to a better renal safety profile and improved clinical endpoints such as mortality and heart failure-related hospitalizations.

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