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Treatment of chronic recurrent juvenile parotitis using sialendoscopy.

CONCLUSION: The combination of sialendoscopy and an intraductal application of corticosteroids can be recommended for children with chronic recurrent juvenile parotitis (CRJP) as there is growing evidence for a positive effect in the absence of side effects.

OBJECTIVE: CRJP is a disorder with painful, episodic swelling of the parotid gland in children. The majority of cases have a self-limiting character within 5-10 years, but the disease may also continue into adulthood. CRJP can occur on one or both sides and up to now the etiology has been unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the therapeutic effect of a sialendoscopic application of corticosteroids on the clinical course of patients with CRJP.

METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical course of 9 children with 10 parotid glands affected by CRJP, who all underwent sialendoscopy and intraductal application of corticosteroids. In all cases the procedure was conducted under general anesthesia. The average follow-up period was 15 months.

RESULTS: There were no side effects associated with the sialendoscopy. All duct systems showed signs of chronic inflammation with an atrophic or thickened epithelium. At the follow-up visit, CRJP symptoms had completely resolved in eight children. One child still showed slight parotid swellings without the need for antibiotics. None of the parents reported that symptoms had continued at an equal level or worsened after sialendoscopy.

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