JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Whipple's disease: clinical, biochemical, and histopathologic features and assessment of treatment in 29 patients.

Whipple's disease is a chronic systemic illness, the optimal treatment of which remains poorly defined. In our analysis of a 30-year, 29-patient experience with Whipple's disease at the Mayo Clinic, the frequent initial manifestations of diarrhea, weight loss, arthritis, and lymphadenopathy correlated with findings reported previously by other investigators. Antibiotic therapy yielded rapid symptomatic and biochemical improvement, and histologic changes in the small bowel occurred subsequently. Despite antimicrobial therapy, relapses in patients with Whipple's disease are common, and the central nervous system is considered the most serious site of involvement for recurrence. Administration of an antibiotic agent that is able to cross the blood-brain barrier may be more important in preventing relapse than prolonged duration of initial antimicrobial therapy.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app