JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Traumatic coagulopathy—part 2: Resuscitative strategies

Lee Palmer, Linda Martin
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care 2014, 24 (1): 75-92
24393363

OBJECTIVE: To discuss the current resuscitative strategies for trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock and acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC).

ETIOLOGY: Hemorrhagic shock can be acutely fatal if not immediately and appropriately treated. The primary tenets of hemorrhagic shock resuscitation are to arrest hemorrhage and restore the effective circulating volume. Large volumes of isotonic crystalloids have been the resuscitative strategy of choice; however, data from experimental animal models and retrospective human analyses now recognize that large-volume fluid resuscitation in uncontrolled hemorrhage may be deleterious. The optimal resuscitative strategy has yet to be defined. In human trauma, implementing damage control resuscitation with damage control surgery for controlling ongoing hemorrhage, acidosis, and hypothermia; managing ATC; and restoring effective circulating volume is emerging as a more optimal resuscitative strategy. With hyperfibrinolysis playing an integral role in the manifestation of ATC, the use of antifibrinolytics (eg, tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid) may also serve a beneficial role in the early posttraumatic period. Considering the sparse information regarding these resuscitative techniques in veterinary medicine, veterinarians are left with extrapolating information from human trials and experimental animal models.

DIAGNOSIS: Viscoelastic tests integrated with predictive scoring systems may prove to be the most reliable methods for early detection of ATC as well as for guiding transfusion requirements.

SUMMARY: Hemorrhage accounts for up to 40% of human trauma-related deaths and remains the leading cause of preventable death in human trauma. The exact proportion of trauma-related deaths due to exsanguinations in veterinary patients remains uncertain. Survivability depends upon achieving rapid definitive hemostasis, early attenuation of posttraumatic coagulopathy, and timely restoration of effective circulating volume. Early institution of damage control resuscitation in severely injured patients with uncontrolled hemorrhage has the ability to curtail posttraumatic coagulopathy and the exacerbation of metabolic acidosis and hypothermia and improve survival until definitive hemostasis is achieved.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
24393363
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"