JOURNAL ARTICLE
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Long-term prognosis after medical treatment of Graves' disease in a northern Swedish population 2000-2010.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the long-term prognosis of patients with Graves' disease (GD) after antithyroid drug (ATD) treatment and follow-up outside of highly specialised care.

DESIGN AND METHODS: Medical records of all patients diagnosed with first-time GD in 2000-2010 with at least 6 months ATD treatment at a central hospital and follow-up in primary health care in the county of Norrbotten in northern Sweden were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were followed for relapse until 31st December 2012. We included 219 patients (mean age 46 years, 82.5% women) with follow-up of maximum 10 years and 829 observed patient years. Data were analysed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and log-rank test.

RESULTS: During the observation period, 43.5% of the patients had relapsed into active GD. The cumulative relapse rates were 22.6, 30.2, 36.9 and 41.5% after 6 months, 1, 3 and 5 years respectively. The presence of goitre (P=0.014) predicted relapse. Previous smoking was protective against relapse (P=0.003). The levels of free thyroxine or free tri-iodothyronine, age, gender, current smoking and ophthalmopathy did not predict relapse. Agranulocytosis was found in 1.7% (95% CI 0.7-4.0%).

CONCLUSION: A long-term remission of 56.5%, in an iodine-sufficient area where ATD is offered to most patients in the real world of central and district hospitals, is higher than in most studies. Relapse was most common during the first year, and prognosis was excellent after 4 years without relapse. The protective effect of previous smoking merits further research.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app