Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

High-dose midazolam infusion for refractory status epilepticus.

Neurology 2014 January 29
OBJECTIVE: This study compares 2 treatment protocols allowing low vs high continuous IV midazolam (cIV-MDZ) doses.

METHODS: We compared adults with refractory status epilepticus treated with a protocol allowing for high-dose cIV-MDZ (n = 100; 2002-2011) with those treated with the previous lower-dose cIV-MDZ (n = 29; 1996-2000). We collected data on baseline characteristics, cIV-MDZ doses, seizure control, hospital course, and outcome.

RESULTS: Median maximum cIV-MDZ dose was 0.4 mg/kg/h (interquartile range [IQR] 0.2, 1.0) for the high-dose group and 0.2 mg/kg/h (IQR 0.1, 0.3) for the low-dose group (p < 0.001) with similar duration of infusion. Median time from status epilepticus onset to cIV-MDZ start was 1 day (IQR 1, 3) for the high-dose group and 2 days (IQR 1, 5) for the low-dose group (p = 0.016). "Withdrawal seizures" (occurring within 48 hours of discontinuation of cIV-MDZ) were less frequent in the high-dose group (15% vs 64%, odds ratio 0.10, 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.27). "Ultimate cIV-MDZ failure" (patients requiring change to a different cIV antiepileptic medication) and hospital complications were not different between groups. Hypotension was more frequent with higher cIV-MDZ doses but was not associated with worse outcome. Discharge mortality was lower in the high-dose group (40% vs 62%, odds ratio 0.34, 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.92 in multivariate analysis).

CONCLUSIONS: High-dose cIV-MDZ treatment of refractory status epilepticus can be performed safely, is associated with a lower seizure rate after cIV-MDZ discontinuation, and may be associated with lower mortality than traditional lower-dose protocols.

CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class III evidence that midazolam at higher infusion rates is associated with a reduction in seizure recurrence within 48 hours after discontinuation and may be associated with lower mortality.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app