COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Comparing the predictive value of the pelvic ring injury classification systems by Tile and by Young and Burgess

Georg Osterhoff, Max J Scheyerer, Yannick Fritz, Samy Bouaicha, Guido A Wanner, Hans-Peter Simmen, Clément M L Werner
Injury 2014, 45 (4): 742-7
24360744

INTRODUCTION: Radiology-based classifications of pelvic ring injuries and their relevance for the prognosis of morbidity and mortality are disputed in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential differences between the pelvic ring injury classification systems by Tile and by Young and Burgess with regard to their predictive value on mortality, transfusion/infusion requirement and concomitant injuries.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two-hundred-and-eighty-five consecutive patients with pelvic ring fractures were analyzed for mortality within 30 days after admission, number of blood units and total volume of fluid infused during the first 24h after trauma, the Abbreviated Injury Severity (AIS) scores for head, chest, spine, abdomen and extremities as a function of the Tile and the Young-Burgess classifications.

RESULTS: There was no significant relationship between occurrence of death and fracture pattern but a significant relationship between fracture pattern and need for blood units/total fluid volume for Tile (p<.001/p<.001) and Young-Burgess (p<.001/p<.001). In both classifications, open book fractures were associated with more fluid requirement and more severe injuries of the abdomen, spine and extremities (p<.05). When divided into the larger subgroups "partially stable" and "unstable", unstable fractures were associated with a higher mortality rate in the Young-Burgess system (p=.036). In both classifications, patients with unstable fractures required significantly more blood transfusions (p<.001) and total fluid infusion (p<.001) and higher AIS scores.

CONCLUSIONS: In this first direct comparison of both classifications, we found no clinical relevant differences with regard to their predictive value on mortality, transfusion/infusion requirement and concomitant injuries.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
24360744
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"

We want to hear from doctors like you!

Take a second to answer a survey question.