JOURNAL ARTICLE

Amplatzer septal occluder migration into the pulmonary trunk: surgical removal through a totally thoracoscopic approach

Giovanni Domenico Cresce, Alessandro Favaro, Stefano Auriemma, Loris Salvador
Innovations: Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery 2013, 8 (5): 381-3
24304710
The Amplatzer Septal Occluder for transcatheter closure of interatrial communications is a standard procedure and a widely accepted alternative to surgery in most patients with atrial septal defect (ASD). Device dislocation or embolization has been reported as one of the commonest complications of ASD percutaneous closure. In this case, if a transcatheter removal is not possible, it requires a surgical therapy, usually through a median sternotomy. We report on a case of a 30-year-old woman, who underwent percutaneous closure of an ostium secundum ASD. After a late embolization of the Amplatzer Septal Occluder into the pulmonary trunk 10 months later, the implant was successfully obtained via a surgical removal through a video-guided minimally invasive port-access approach. This case shows that, in experienced hands, the port-access technique for surgical procedures on the pulmonary trunk is feasible, and therefore, it might be a good alternative option to the traditional surgery, mainly in young patients.

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