JOURNAL ARTICLE
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
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Long-term oral therapy with valganciclovir in patients with Posner-Schlossman syndrome.

BACKGROUND: To assess the short-term and long-term efficacy of oral therapy with valganciclovir in patients with Posner-Schlossman Syndrome (PSS).

METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study on 11 patients with PSS treated with valganciclovir. The PSS was diagnosed clinically on the basis of recurrent episodes of anterior uveitis associated with attacks of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). All patients who did not respond to aciclovir, or whose cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the aqueous humour was positive, were treated with valganciclovir (Valcyte®). Initially, the drug was given 900 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, followed by 450 mg twice daily for a mean period of 20 months (range 10-46 months).

RESULTS: Eleven patients with mean age of 44 years were included in this study. Four of 11 patients were working in a sanitary profession. Before initiation of valgancicloivir therapy, the highest IOP was 68 mmHg (mean 45 mmHg ±9 mmHg). In the first week of treatment, the IOP decreased significantly (mean 16 mmHg ±10 mmHg) and maintained stability during the entire treatment period. In seven of 11 (63.6 %) patients, valganciclovir led to resolution of inflammatory activity and stable IOP. In six patients, the therapy could be discontinued after a mean of 14 months. However, two patients had a recurrence after discontinuation of valganciclovir treatment. No side effects of therapy were observed.

CONCLUSIONS: Long-term oral therapy with valganciclovir seems to lower the recurrence rate in patients with clinically diagnosed PSS.

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