JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ambulatory ECG-based T-wave alternans monitoring for risk assessment and guiding medical therapy: mechanisms and clinical applications

Richard L Verrier, Takanori Ikeda
Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 2013, 56 (2): 172-85
24215749
Identification of individuals at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD), the main cause of adult mortality in developed countries, remains a major challenge. The main contemporary noninvasive marker, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), has not proved adequately reliable, as the majority of individuals who die suddenly have relatively preserved cardiac mechanical function. Monitoring of T-wave alternans (TWA), a beat-to-beat fluctuation in ST-segment or T-wave morphology, on ambulatory electrocardiogram (AECG) is an attractive approach on both scientific and clinical grounds. Specifically, TWA's capacity to assess risk for malignant arrhythmias has been shown to rest on sound electrophysiologic principles and AECG-based TWA monitoring can be performed in the flow of routine clinical evaluation. This review addresses: (1) electrophysiologic and ionic mechanisms underlying TWA's predictivity, (2) principles and practical aspects of AECG-based TWA monitoring, (3) clinical evidence supporting this approach to SCD risk stratification, and (4) current and potential applications in guiding medical therapy.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
24215749
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"