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Loss of villin immunoexpression in colorectal carcinoma is associated with poor differentiation and survival.

Background and Aims. Villin is a highly specialised protein and is expressed in intestinal and renal proximal tubular epithelium. It was detected in colorectal carcinomas (CRC) and other nongastrointestinal tumours. The aim of the current study is to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of villin in a subset of primary CRC and determine its relation to tumour differentiation, invasion, nodal metastasis, recurrence, and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods. Paraffin blocks of 93 cases of CRC were retrieved constituting 93 primary CRC and 58 adjacent normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antivillin antibody. The extent (%) of villin immunoexpression was categorised for statistical analysis. Statistical tests were used to determine the association of villin with clinicopathological characteristics: age, sex, tumour location, tumour size, depth of invasion, tumour grade, nodal metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, margin status, recurrence, and survival. Results. Villin immunostaining results showed that villin is downregulated in CRC. Villin has no association with age, sex, tumour location, depth of invasion, nodal metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, margin status, and recurrence. However, villin is expressed in higher rate in CRC less than 5 cm, well- and moderately differentiated CRC. Poor survival was associated with tumour with low villin immunoexpression. Conclusion. Villin was downregulated in CRC. Villin immunoexpression in CRC is associated with better survival, well-differentiated tumours, and small-sized tumours. Villin has no significant association with disease recurrence or nodal metastasis. More in vivo and in vitro studies are required for further elucidation of how villin may be involved in CRC.

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