Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effects of uric acid-lowering therapy on renal outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BACKGROUND: Non-randomized studies suggest an association between serum uric acid levels and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this systematic review is to summarize evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning the benefits and risks of uric acid-lowering therapy on renal outcomes.

METHODS: Medline, Excerpta Medical Database and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched with English language restriction for RCTs comparing the effect of uric acid-lowering therapy with placebo/no treatment on renal outcomes. Treatment effects were summarized using random-effects meta-analysis.

RESULTS: Eight trials (476 participants) evaluating allopurinol treatment were eligible for inclusion. There was substantial heterogeneity in baseline kidney function, cause of CKD and duration of follow-up across these studies. In five trials, there was no significant difference in change in glomerular filtration rate from baseline between the allopurinol and control arms [mean difference (MD) 3.1 mL/min/1.73 m2, 95% confidence intervals (CI) -0.9, 7.1; heterogeneity χ2=1.9, I2=0%, P=0.75]. In three trials, allopurinol treatment abrogated increases in serum creatinine from baseline (MD -0.4 mg/dL, 95% CI -0.8, -0.0 mg/dL; heterogeneity χ2=3, I2=34%, P=0.22). Allopurinol had no effect on proteinuria and blood pressure. Data for effects of allopurinol therapy on progression to end-stage kidney disease and death were scant. Allopurinol had uncertain effects on the risks of adverse events.

CONCLUSIONS: Uric acid-lowering therapy with allopurinol may retard the progression of CKD. However, adequately powered randomized trials are required to evaluate the benefits and risks of uric acid-lowering therapy in CKD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app