JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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The costs and effects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and digital substraction angiography on quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

Acta Radiologica 2014 April
BACKGROUND: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) both have a high diagnostic performance in the imaging of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). However, little is known about the effects of initial, preoperative imaging using MRA or DSA on quality of life (QoL) in relation to costs (cost-utility).

PURPOSE: To compare cost-utility of treatment strategies using either MRA or DSA as the principal imaging tool, related to QoL, in patients with PAOD.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a prospective subgroup analysis of patients randomized between MRA and DSA (n = 79) for preoperative imaging, QoL questionnaires (SF-36) were obtained at randomization and at 4-month follow-up. Cost-effectiveness from hospital perspective was subsequently compared between groups and the difference in gained or lost QoL per € spent assessed using bootstrap analysis.

RESULTS: No difference in quality of life was found. A treatment trajectory employing MRA as the principal imaging modality was almost 20% cheaper, leading to a better cost-utility ratio in favor of MRA.

CONCLUSION: A treatment plan for peripheral arterial occlusive disease employing MRA versus DSA as the principal imaging modality yields a better cost/QoL ratio for MRA.

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