COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

The short-form mini-nutritional assessment is as effective as the full-mini nutritional assessment in predicting follow-up 4-year mortality in elderly Taiwanese

J Y Wang, A C Tsai
Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging 2013, 17 (7): 594-8
23933869

OBJECTIVE: To compare the mortality-predictive ability of the full- and short-form (SF) Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA).

DESIGN: A prospective cohort study.

SETTING: Population-representative sample.

PARTICIPANTS: 2872 ≥65-year old men and women.

MEASUREMENTS: The study analyzed 1999 and 2003 datasets of the Taiwan Longitudinal Survey on Aging (TLSA). Subjects were graded for nutritional status with the full-MNA and MNA-SF of a Taiwanese-specific version (T2, containing calf circumference instead of BMI) at baseline (1999) and tracked their survival status for 4 years. Mortality-predictive abilities of the full-MNA and MNA-SF were compared using Cox regression analysis and Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI).

RESULTS: The full-MNA and MNA-SF have comparable abilities in predicting follow-up 4-year mortality risk according to the hazard ratios (all p<0.001) and Akaike information criterion (AIC). It also showed a slight improvement (not significant) if the full-MNA in a predictive model was replaced by the MNA-SF (NRI=0.09%, p=0.956).

CONCLUSION: The MNA-SF has at least comparable or even slightly better ability in predicting follow-up 4-year mortality risk of elderly Taiwanese. Results suggest that MNA-SF with calf circumference may possess some basic characteristics of a comprehensive and universal geriatric screening scale.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
23933869
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"