JOURNAL ARTICLE

The hard Test Your Memory. Evaluation of a short cognitive test to detect mild Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment

Jeremy M Brown, Julie Wiggins, Huan Dong, Rebecca Harvey, Frances Richardson, Kristina Hunter, Kate Dawson, Richard A Parker
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 2014, 29 (3): 272-80
23929807

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is the evaluation of a novel cognitive test, the hard Test Your Memory (H-TYM), in the detection of mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI).

METHODS: This paper uses a prospective study in an outpatient memory clinic. We recruited 97 patients with a diagnosis of mild AD or aMCI aged between 50 and 80 years. All scored 20 or more on the mini mental state examination (MMSE). We recruited 200 controls from a similar background. The patients were given a novel short cognitive test (H-TYM) designed to test recall of newly learnt visual and verbal material together with the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Assessment Revised, MMSE, and TYM test.

RESULTS: Alzheimer's disease/aMCI patients completed the H-TYM with an average recall score of 6.69 (SD 3.45); control participants scored an average of 20.4 (SD 4.54). The H-TYM detected 95% of cases of mild AD/aMCI on the basis of an optimum cutoff point. The area under the receiver operating characteristic for the H-TYM ratio was calculated to be 0.989 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.980-0.997.

CONCLUSIONS: The H-TYM test has an excellent ability to discriminate between AD/aMCI cases and healthy controls. The H-TYM is a useful tool for the detection of mild AD/aMCI, and it detects AD/aMCI in the majority of patients who "pass" the MMSE and Addenbrooke's Cognitive Assessment Revised.

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