JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
VALIDATION STUDY
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Prognostic stratification of patients with vasospastic angina: a comprehensive clinical risk score developed by the Japanese Coronary Spasm Association.

OBJECTIVES: The present study aimed to develop a comprehensive clinical risk score for vasospastic angina (VSA) patients.

BACKGROUND: Previous studies demonstrated various prognostic factors of future adverse events in VSA patients. However, to apply these prognostic factors in clinical practice, the assessment of their accumulation in individual patients is important.

METHODS: The patient database of the multicenter registry study by the Japanese Coronary Spasm Association (JCSA) (n = 1,429; median 66 years; median follow-up 32 months) was utilized for score derivation.

RESULTS: Multivariable Cox proportional hazard model selected 7 predictors of major adverse cardiac events (MACE). The integer score was assigned to each predictors proportional to their respective adjusted hazard ratio; history of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (4 points), smoking, angina at rest alone, organic coronary stenosis, multivessel spasm (2 points each), ST-segment elevation during angina, and beta-blocker use (1 point each). According to the total score in individual patients, 3 risk strata were defined; low (score 0 to 2, n = 598), intermediate (score 3 to 5, n = 639) and high (score 6 or more, n = 192). The incidences of MACE in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients were 2.5%, 7.0%, and 13.0%, respectively (p < 0.001). The Cox model for MACE between the 3 risk strata also showed prognostic utility of the scoring system in various clinical subgroups. The average prediction rate of the scoring system in the internal training and validation sets were 86.6% and 86.5%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: We developed a novel scoring system, the JCSA risk score, which may provide the comprehensive risk assessment and prognostic stratification for VSA patients.

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