JOURNAL ARTICLE
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of hematogenous vertebral osteomyelitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Journal of Infection 2013 December
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of patients with hematogenous vertebral osteomyelitis (HVO) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

METHODS: We performed a cohort study of adult patients diagnosed with S. aureus HVO at a tertiary-care hospital over a 7-year period.

RESULTS: Of the 139 patients with S. aureus HVO, MRSA caused 62 (44.6%) cases. In multivariate analysis, compared with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), MRSA was associated with a higher risk of persistent bacteremia (≥7 days) (8.40 fold; P < 0.001) and relapse (4.83 fold; P = 0.03), and increased hospital stay (1.69 fold; P = 0.001). Among the MRSA cases, relapse rates differed according to duration of antibiotics: 41.7% (4-6 weeks), 25.0% (6-8 weeks), and 5.6% (≥8 weeks) (P = 0.007). Bacteremia was more likely to persist for ≥7 days in patients with an initial vancomycin trough <15 mg/L than in those with an initial trough ≥15 mg/L (79.3% vs. 20.0%; P = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: MRSA HVO was associated with more frequent persistent bacteremia (≥7 days) and relapse, and longer hospital stay compared to MSSA HVO. Antibiotic therapy for ≥8 weeks and targeting a vancomycin trough of ≥15 mg/L may be benefit patients with MRSA HVO.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app