CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Pre-Descemet corneal dystrophy and X-linked ichthyosis associated with deletion of Xp22.31 containing the STS gene.

Cornea 2013 September
PURPOSE: To report the association of X-linked ichthyosis and pre-Descemet corneal dystrophy with a deletion of the steroid sulfatase gene (STS) detected with microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).

METHODS: A slit-lamp biomicroscopic examination and cutaneous examination were performed, after which a saliva sample was collected as a source of genomic DNA. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of each of the 10 exons of STS was performed, as was aCGH on genomic DNA to detect copy number variation.

RESULTS: The slit-lamp examination revealed punctate opacities in the posterior corneal stroma of each eye. The cutaneous examination demonstrated scaling and flaking skin of the arms and legs. Polymerase chain reaction amplification using primers designed to amplify each of the 10 exons of STS failed to produce any amplicons. Subsequently, aCGH performed on genomic DNA revealed a microdeletion in the Xp22.31 cytoband of approximately 1.7 megabases, containing STS.

CONCLUSIONS: The identification of a microdeletion within Xp22.3 containing STS with aCGH in an individual with suspected pre-Descemet corneal dystrophy and X-linked ichthyosis demonstrates the clinical utility of copy number variation analysis in confirming a presumptive clinical diagnosis.

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