VALIDATION STUDY
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Factors influencing therapists' adoption of virtual reality for brain injury rehabilitation.

Virtual reality (VR) is an important emerging technology that is increasingly being introduced in health centers as a rehabilitation intervention. Quantitative research is needed to identify the factors influencing therapists' adoption of VR for brain injury rehabilitation, including barriers and facilitators to VR use, in order to inform successful implementation strategies. A measure based on the decomposed theory of planned behavior (DTPB) was developed and administered to 42 therapists; early psychometric properties are reported. Mean or median composite scores and correlations were calculated for each DTPB construct. Overall, therapists had positive attitudes toward VR, perceived it as being useful, and had positive intentions to use it more in the future. The self-efficacy composite yielded the lowest scores. The most significant barrier to adoption was time, while social influences and knowledge were the primary facilitators. Future research will explore the impact of knowledge translation interventions on these mediators of VR adoption.

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