JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Henoch Schonlein Purpura in children: clinical analysis of 120 cases.

BACKGROUND: Henoch Schonlein Purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitic disease which is common in children. It is very important to understand the clinical features of this disease for doctors and nurses.

OBJECTIVES: To study the clinical characteristics of HSP in children.

METHODS: Collect the clinical data of the HSP children, and analyze the clinical characteristics of these HSP patients.

RESULTS: The ratio of M:F was 1.9:1. The mean age was 6.6 ± 1.6 years. The typical onset seasons were spring, winter and autumn. Infection and food allergy were the main etiological factors. The first symptom was skin purpura and these purpura mainly concentrated the lower extremities and buttocks. The dominant digestive clinical features were abdominal pains and vomiting. The knee joint and ankle joint were most frequently affected. The typical kidney symptoms were microscopic hematuria and albuminuria. An increased ESR was reported in 68 patients (56.7%). Serum C3 decreased in 13 cases (10.8%). ASO titer was higher in 57 children (47.5%).

CONCLUSION: There were gender, season and area differences for the HSP patients. The etiological factors were diverse. HSP patients could have various clinical symptoms and rare complications.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app