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Pulp vitality preservation after traumatic dental injuries to permanent teeth.

INTRODUCTION: The pulp vitality preservation after a trauma to permanent teeth is of great importance since dental injuries are common. The aim of our study was to investigate the pulp vitality preservation after tooth injuries.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of records of patients with a trauma was performed. The sample consisted of all patients who had been referred to the Department of Dentistry of Vojvodina for a trauma to permanent teeth during the period 2005-2010. We recorded the type of injury, treatment, state of vitality during the first visit and subsequent check-ups.

RESULTS: The study included 162 children and adolescents aged 6-18 years having a trauma to 314 permanent teeth. The most frequent type of injuries in permanent teeth was fractures (54.5%), whereas luxation was a less common trauma (45.5%). Though different kinds of traumas have different optimal time for treatment, a period of 24 hours was taken as optimal; hence, 189 teeth were treated in optimal time and 55 complications occurred in them; while 105 complications occurred in 114 teeth which were treated 24 hours after the trauma. A year after the trauma the pulp vitality was preserved in 88 teeth (32%), pulp necrosis and other complications developed in 160 teeth (68%).

CONCLUSION: The therapy of pulp vitality preservation in injured teeth was found successful in 32% and unsuccessful in 68% of cases at check-ups over one year.

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