JOURNAL ARTICLE

Driving drowsy also worsens driver distraction

Clare Anderson, James A Horne
Sleep Medicine 2013, 14 (5): 466-8
23523431

OBJECTIVES: Laboratory-based studies show that drowsiness increases the propensity to become distracted. As this phenomenon has not been investigated in drowsy drivers, we underwent a pilot study under realistic monotonous driving conditions to see if distraction was more apparent when drowsy; if so, how does it affect driving performance?

METHODS: A repeated measures counterbalanced design whereby participants drove for two hours in a fully interactive car simulator during the bi circadian afternoon drive, after a night of either normal (baseline) or restricted sleep to five hours (sleep restriction). Videos of drivers' faces were analysed blind for short (<3 s) and long (>3 s) distractions, in which drivers took their eyes off the road ahead. These results were compared with the likelihood of simultaneous lane-drifting incidents, when at least two wheels left the driving lane.

RESULTS: More distractions occurred after restricted sleep (p<0.005) for both short and long distractions (p<0.05). There was an overall significant (p<0.02) positive correlation between distractions and driving incidents for both conditions but with significantly more distraction-related incidents after sleep restriction (p<0.03).

CONCLUSIONS: Following restricted sleep, drivers had an increased propensity to become distracted, which was associated with an increased likelihood of poor driving performance as evidenced by the car leaving the driving lane.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
23523431
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"