Consensus Development Conference
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A consensus report on appropriate treatment optimization and transitioning in the management of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

BACKGROUND: There is limited information on systemic and biological treatment optimization and transitioning in routine clinical practice.

OBJECTIVE: To provide practical guidance on treatment optimization and transitioning for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

METHODS: Dermatologists from 33 countries contributed to the Transitioning Therapies programme. Fourteen questions were identified. Answers were drafted based on systematic literature reviews (7/14 questions) and expert opinion (7/14 questions). Using a modified Delphi procedure, dermatologists from 30 countries voted on their level of agreement with each draft answer (scale: 1-9, strong disagreement to strong agreement). Consensus was defined as ≥75% of participants scoring within the 7-9 range.

RESULTS: Consensus was achieved on the answers to all questions. Recommendations for the use of cyclosporine and methotrexate were agreed. Transitioning from a conventional systemic therapy to a biological agent may be done directly or with an overlap (if transitioning is required because of lack of efficacy) or potentially with a treatment-free interval (if transitioning is required for safety reasons). Combination therapy may be beneficial. Continuous therapy for patients on biologicals is strongly recommended. However, during successful maintenance with biological monotherapy, a dosage reduction may be considered to limit drug exposure, although this may carry the risk of decreased efficacy. Switching biologicals for reasons of efficacy should be done without a washout period, but switching for reasons of safety may require a treatment-free interval.

CONCLUSION: This consensus provides practical guidance on treatment optimization and transitioning for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, based on literature reviews and the expert opinion of dermatologists from across the globe.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app